What will it be surface-transport profile-wise, once the pandemic ends?

No one knows with absolute certainty what transportation patterns in the United States will be like once over the Corona Virus pandemic or whether we’ll return to travel patterns exactly the way they were pre-pandemic. Speaking to this, a team of researchers from two universities (Vanderbilt and Cornell) got to work to consider several possible … Read more

SJV-transport-improvement-road direct; progress made on multiple fronts

In California’s expansive and agriculturally conducive San Joaquin Valley, encompassing eight counties in all, one-in-five children is an asthmatic. According to the California High-Speed Rail Authority highlighting childhood health and freight and passenger train transport and travel in a media release expresses that in the Valley the childhood asthma rate is better than double the … Read more

2020 Draft California High-Speed Rail Business Plan issued for review, comment

The below Feb. 12, 2020 news release from the California High-Speed Rail Authority. Advancing California’s leadership in building a modern, clean, and sustainable transportation system, the California High-Speed Rail Authority (Authority) today [Feb. 12, 2020] issued its Draft 2020 Business Plan for public review and comment. The Draft 2020 Business Plan affirms the policy recommendation … Read more

Latest California high-speed rail plan questioned

A newspaper editorial dealing with the subject of California high-speed rail ran in the Dec. 24, 2019 Los Angeles Daily News edition. Access to the full Daily News editorial can be had here. Discussed is the fifth and final phase or package of the construction program in the San Joaquin Valley or what is known … Read more

Trackless trains: Is that the future? 2

Trackless trains by definition have no wheels nor do they rely on rails upon which railroad wheels roll, as is the case with conventional rail systems, the exception being the Tubular Rail passenger application, in this case the understanding being that the plan is to employ rails (and rollers which, according to the plan, are … Read more

One ‘Valley Rail’ plan really worth a further look

The intent of the California high-speed-rail program is to connect Los Angeles and San Francisco by high-speed train. If all goes according to plan, an express, non-stop train between the former and latter, will cover the 520-rail-mile distance in under three hours. Eventually, Sacramento and San Diego will be brought online. The state high-speed rail … Read more

A mode less traveled – rail: What it affords that roads don’t – Part 2

A concluding thought in “Road expansion or repair: Can either do anything to lower burden on air?” (Part 1) had to do with whether road-based projects – expansion or repair thereof – could have “an air-remedying effect.” Affirmative is the answer. Though “yes,” it’s conditional. A new overpass used to replace a physical intersection, for … Read more

Strange why more passenger-rail pikes in California aren’t being called for more

Today’s thread is a follow-on to “Why moving dedicated HSR funds to California rail ‘bookends’ projects is a bad idea.” Interest in creating a Bakersfield-to-Merced commuter-rail service in the San Joaquin Valley, was budding long before California Proposition 1A (the Safe, Reliable High-Speed Passenger Train Bond Act for the 21st Century) was voted on and … Read more

Why moving dedicated HSR funds to California rail ‘bookends’ projects is a bad idea

There’s a proposal floating suggesting taking away dedicated monies from high-speed rail in California’s San Joaquin Valley and rededicating those for passenger rail improvement purposes both in the north and south state. The monies would be used for improving existing Metrolink service between Anaheim and Burbank in southern California and Caltrain in the San Francisco … Read more

Driving – with congestion, delay, emissions from, all up – the good news, there is some

As it has to do with mobility, there has been much in the media in recent days and with good reason. Here in America, not only is the number of miles traveled up, but so too is the trend: it appears to be non-stop. Effectively, the more people the more aggregate miles there are, whether … Read more